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Helen Faulkner
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Arthur Homeshaw
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Arthur Homeshaw

Arthur Homeshaw (1933-2011) was a powerful artist and lino-cut printmaker who gave us his own original take on the landscape. Whilst Arthur drew inspiration from the likes of Paul Nash and Eric Ravilious his chosen pallette, his study of complex patterns in the landscape and semi-abstract representations of these were uniquely his. His focus was largely on the varied Devon landscape and he was one of very few artists who could give us fresh ways of looking at Dartmoor. Arthur was a member of the Royal West Academy where he was a regular exhibitor and he was best known in the South West of England. However, he also showed at the Royal Academy and his work is in private collections throughout the UK. Read more.....


Machine in a Landscape II.
Linocut, numbered 13 of edition of 40, signed in ink. Image size: approx 53 X 35 cms.
Condition: excellent.
This print is currently framed with single mount and silvered metal frame.
450  - no charge for the frame.
Purchase or enquire further.....



An Evening Image, Devon.
Linocut, Artist's Proof, signed in pencil.
Condition: there is some foxing but the image is largely unaffected.
This print is currently framed, see image. Note that the colours of the print are more accurately rendered in the framed image.
350 - no charge for the frame.
Purchase or enquire further.....


In Arthur's own words:

'The wooden engravings of Eric Ravilious have been a constant source of inspiration since my student days when I studied wood engraving. Later when I became more involved with linocut prints Ravilious' use of pattern and texture in his watercolour paintings became an influence as did the visionary landscapes of Samuel Palmer
and Paul Nash. I also enjoy works by Henry Moore and Graham Sutherland. Probably the greatest influence on my work has been the Devon landscape which I fell for when stationed near Newton Abbot.'